Tag: Sql Clauses

SQL Window Functions By Explanation

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In our previous post, we explained how SQL window functions work by example. We started with some very simple, basic functions. Let’s extend it by explaining subclauses in window functions. SQL window functions are a great way to compute results from a set of rows rather than a single row. As you know from our first article, the “window” in window function refers to the set of rows.

An Illustrated Guide to Multiple Join

So far, our articles in the “An Illustrated Guide” series have explained several join types: INNER JOINs, OUTER JOINs (LEFT JOIN, RIGHT JOIN, FULL JOIN), CROSS JOIN, self-join and non-equi join. In this final article of the series, we show you how to create SQL queries that match data from multiple tables using one or more join types. Join Types in SQL Queries Before we start discussing example SQL queries that use multiple join types, let’s do a short recap of the join types we’ve covered so far, just to be sure you understand the differences.

An Illustrated Guide to the SQL Non-Equi Join

Did you know that an SQL join doesn’t have to be based on identical matches? In this post, we look at the non-equi join, which uses ‘non-equal’ operators to match records. We’ve already discussed several types of joins, including self-joins and CROSS JOIN, INNER JOIN and OUTER JOIN. These types of joins typically appear with the equals sign (=). However, some joins use conditions other than the equals (=) sign.

An Illustrated Guide to the SQL Self-Join

What is an SQL self-join and how does it work? When should it be used? We’ll provide answers to those questions! In SQL, we can combine data from multiple tables by using a JOIN operator. JOIN has several variants; we’ve already discussed CROSS JOIN, INNER JOIN, and OUTER JOIN. Most of the time, these operators join data from two or more different tables. In this article, however, we will explain how to join records from the same table.

How to Track Down Duplicate Values in a Table

When it comes to information management, duplicates present one of the most common challenges to data quality. In this article, I’ll explain how it is possible to find and distinguish duplicate names with the help of the SQL data programming language. I really like my maiden name. The reason I like it so much is because it’s rare. My maiden name (first with last) provided a unique identifier on platforms such as LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and similar.

An Illustrated Guide to the SQL OUTER JOIN

We’ve already discussed the SQL CROSS JOIN and INNER JOIN statements. It’s time to explore another: OUTER JOIN. What is it? How does it work? Let’s find out! If you’ve read our other posts, you know that you can link the data in two or more database tables using one of the many types of SQL join operator. Today, we’ll discuss the three kinds of OUTER JOIN: LEFT OUTER JOIN, RIGHT OUTER JOIN, and FULL OUTER JOIN.

An Illustrated Guide to the SQL INNER JOIN

What is an SQL INNER JOIN, and how does it work? Let’s find out! In my last article, I discussed the CROSS JOIN operation in SQL. Today, we’ll look at INNER JOIN and how to use it. Is it the same as a JOIN? How many tables can you link with an INNER JOIN? These are all good questions. Let’s look at the answers! What is an INNER JOIN? INNER JOIN combines data from multiple tables by joining them based on a matching record.

An Illustrated Guide to the SQL CROSS JOIN

What is an SQL CROSS JOIN statement? When should you use it? When shouldn’t you use it? This post will tell you what you need to know about CROSS JOIN. You already know that you can use the SQL JOIN statement to join one or more tables that share a matching record. And if you’re read the Vertabelo Academy post Learning SQL JOINs Using Real Life Situations, you know that there are many types of JOINs.

Learning SQL JOINs Using Real-Life Situations

The JOIN statement lets you work with data stored in multiple tables. This article is a practical introduction to the SQL JOIN. Imagine if you could only work with one database table at a time. Fortunately, this isn’t anything we have to worry about. Once you learn the JOIN statement, you can start linking data together. This article will give you examples that illustrate how we use JOINs, how each type of JOIN works, and when to use each type.